So All is Peace by Vandana Singh-Lal

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Head over to @cafesncities website for the full article. Posting a usual sized excerpt here Digesting emotions from a clinical perspective is an arduous task, but a deeply revealing one. Although it appears strange and rather inhumane to analyse feelings, and extreme ones at that, from a cool, detached outlook, but the results are always eye-opening. Death, for example, is always spoken about in terms of extremes. On one end of the rather presumptively bleak and dark rainbow is hysteria and fear, with a clamour to avoid the unknown. The other end of the spectrum is one of unabashed acceptance of the inevitable and unbridled joy. Here’s where the clinical approach stands out. Death is simply that. Death. End of a life. No joy, no fear, no other emotion. Understanding this might make change the context in which one approaches life itself…. This (coping) pivots me towards the other beautiful pathos evoked by this work. The excruciating pain and detail of literally each second of our life, and the unforgiving cruel numbness we, and everyone around us, extends to it. The book has several beautiful instances that detail the same and vividly present the argument that Discussing the minute issues of daily life is considered drifting, while the larger picture is what we fight for. Macroeconomists across the globe just raised a toast. As I wrapped up the last page of this book, I turned it over and stared at its title again. So All is Peace. Indeed so, but then, what is peace? #soallispeace #vandanasinghlal #penguinindia #delhi #booksofdelhi #femaleprotagonist #coping #death #mybookfeatures #uppermiddleclass #fictionbooks #starvation #sexualabuse #emotionalabuse

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This article is done in collaboration with Cafes and Cities, and the entire article (this is just an excerpt) can be found here

Digesting emotions from a clinical perspective is an arduous task, but a deeply revealing one. Although it appears strange and rather inhumane to analyse feelings, and extreme ones at that, from a cool, detached outlook, but the results are always eye-opening. Death, for example, is always spoken about in terms of extremes. On one end of the rather presumptively bleak and dark rainbow is hysteria and fear, with a clamour to avoid the unknown. The other end of the spectrum is one of unabashed acceptance of the inevitable and unbridled joy. Here’s where the clinical approach stands out. Death is simply that. Death. End of a life. No joy, no fear, no other emotion. Understanding this might make change the context in which one approaches life itself…. This (coping) pivots me towards the other beautiful pathos evoked by this work. The excruciating pain and detail of literally each second of our life, and the unforgiving cruel numbness we, and everyone around us, extends to it. The book has several beautiful instances that detail the same and vividly present the argument that Discussing the minute issues of daily life is considered drifting, while the larger picture is what we fight for. Macroeconomists across the globe just raised a toast.

As I wrapped up the last page of this book, I turned it over and stared at its title again. So All is Peace. Indeed so, but then, what is peace?

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