The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

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The beauty of reading is the fact that often a reader will end up interpreting something larger, something personal from an author’s work, with absolutely no intention on the writer’s part. More so than ever for non-fiction work, which is largely deemed to be non-interpretative and instructional, rather than embracing the wide interpretative spectrum of fiction. This is exactly what this book made me experience. I picked it up, purely to discover the hype around the Koi Mari method, and perhaps learn something about tidying up. The end result was quite a departure. The Konmari method, is built on the simple idea of discarding things that do not invoke joy. This foundational principle is coupled with something that may be deemed to be the spirit and vibe of each inanimate object, abstractly letting the room or the location tidy itself up in consolation with the original principle. However, while listening to this audiobook, I found myself extrapolating the first principle of this method to my personal life. I had a rather uninspiring epiphany about tidying my own life. The principle is quite…simplistic and straightforward in that regard and is the perfect Occam’s Razor to the complexities of modern day life. It is indisputable that the modern day world is far more intensely inter-linked than it has ever been before. The butterfly effect is often visible directly in situations now, and the COVID-19 pandemic is a perfect example of this linkage. Working on a rather oversimplified parallel between a messy room and a complicated life, burdened with connections and debris that neither inspire joy, nor good vibes. I found myself stunned by this rather simplistic interpretation, and decided to implement the principle for myself. To be honest, I would love to end this post with an optimistic message praising my experiment as a success, but it is definitely too early to say. All I can tell you is this – try thinking beyond what a non-fiction tome lays out for you. The message your mind will derive is most likely to stun you, and hopefully change you. Also, if it doesn’t evoke joy, let it go. #mariekondo #mariekondomethod #konmari #konmarimethod

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The beauty of reading is the fact that often a reader will end up interpreting something larger, something personal from an author’s work, with absolutely no intention on the writer’s part. More so than ever for non-fiction work, which is largely deemed to be non-interpretative and instructional, rather than embracing the wide interpretative spectrum of fiction. This is exactly what this book made me experience. I picked it up, purely to discover the hype around the Koi Mari method, and perhaps learn something about tidying up. The end result was quite a departure.
The Konmari method, is built on the simple idea of discarding things that do not invoke joy. This foundational principle is coupled with something that may be deemed to be the spirit and vibe of each inanimate object, abstractly letting the room or the location tidy itself up in consolation with the original principle. However, while listening to this audiobook, I found myself extrapolating the first principle of this method to my personal life. I had a rather uninspiring epiphany about tidying my own life. The principle is quite…simplistic and straightforward in that regard and is the perfect Occam’s Razor to the complexities of modern day life.
It is indisputable that the modern day world is far more intensely inter-linked than it has ever been before. The butterfly effect is often visible directly in situations now, and the COVID-19 pandemic is a perfect example of this linkage. Working on a rather oversimplified parallel between a messy room and a complicated life, burdened with connections and debris that neither inspire joy, nor good vibes. I found myself stunned by this rather simplistic interpretation, and decided to implement the principle for myself.
To be honest, I would love to end this post with an optimistic message praising my experiment as a success, but it is definitely too early to say. All I can tell you is this – try thinking beyond what a non-fiction tome lays out for you. The message your mind will derive is most likely to stun you, and hopefully change you. Also, if it doesn’t evoke joy, let it go.

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