The Body Myth by Rheea Mukherjee

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The Body Myth by @messycooking_alwaysvegan Discomfort, by definition is something that we are trained to avoid, or walk away from. Yet somehow, it is the unifying factor of human life, forcing us to confront the banal truth of life – chaos is not the exception, but the rule. Order is not real, but simply an illusion we construct to distract us. That’s something that deeply appealed to me while reading this book. In a beautiful piece weaving together bold, unchartered areas of polyandry, pansexuality, Munchausen’s disease, rapid sufism, and the curious tale of a unique fruit, this book perfectly demonstrates the unease that life often throws our way. Particularly, it is interesting to just think about how for all our appeal to developed intelligence, rational and logical thinking, the most basic of actions are instinctive, reactionary almost. Our constant gift against this contradiction creates this unease, whether it be engaging in toxic relationships, reacting absurdly, or even simply giving into rather messy thoughts. This dissonance between expected or desired reality and the actual entropic simulating one which actually occurs, is what gives rise to the true conflict of human experiences. That being said, beyond this larger idea, this book touched (but nor harped upon) many other ideas which tickled my fancy. For starters, the idea of a symbiotic equation among three people, feeding off a rather negative co-dependency leading to positive growth, was supremely interesting. The idea that not everything bad results in something worse is perplexing on an innate level, and the book itself challenges it notionally, but rather weakly. The cathartic process this paradox yields is strangely satisfying. Not in a way that’ll leave you happy, but in a way that’ll leave you satiated. Photo & Video Credits @thelong.shot 📸 #fiction #thebodymyth #rheeamukherjee #unnamedpress #penguinbooks #penguinindia #polyandry #angst #depression #munchausen #munchausenbyproxy #lgtbq #amorous #sufism #selfdiscovery #romance #lovetriangle #metaphoric #affair #teacher #philosophy #widow #delhi #dilli #dronephotography #dronestagram

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Discomfort, by definition is something that we are trained to avoid, or walk away from. Yet somehow, it is the unifying factor of human life, forcing us to confront the banal truth of life – chaos is not the exception, but the rule. Order is not real, but simply an illusion we construct to distract us. That’s something that deeply appealed to me while reading this book. In a beautiful piece weaving together bold, unchartered areas of polyandry, pansexuality, Munchausen’s disease, rapid sufism, and the curious tale of a unique fruit, this book perfectly demonstrates the unease that life often throws our way.

Particularly, it is interesting to just think about how for all our appeal to developed intelligence, rational and logical thinking, the most basic of actions are instinctive, reactionary almost. Our constant gift against this contradiction creates this unease, whether it be engaging in toxic relationships, reacting absurdly, or even simply giving into rather messy thoughts. This dissonance between expected or desired reality and the actual entropic simulating one which actually occurs, is what gives rise to the true conflict of human experiences.

That being said, beyond this larger idea, this book touched (but nor harped upon) many other ideas which tickled my fancy. For starters, the idea of a symbiotic equation among three people, feeding off a rather negative co-dependency leading to positive growth, was supremely interesting. The idea that not everything bad results in something worse is perplexing on an innate level, and the book itself challenges it notionally, but rather weakly. The cathartic process this paradox yields is strangely satisfying. Not in a way that’ll leave you happy, but in a way that’ll leave you satiated. 

Available on Amazon and Flipkart

Photo Credits – The Long Shot

Check out our podcast with Rheea Mukherjee here and on Youtube here

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