Call Me By Your Name by André Aciman

It’s strange to begin an anecdote in 2020 which revolves around masks, but there is absolutely no other way to talk about this book. Years ago, I read a fact disguised as an inspirational quote – “The person you’ll spend the most time with is yourself”. In that light, it is perhaps the strangest possible…

Amnesty by Arvind Adiga

The centrality of moral conflict in human life is such a given, that describing it seems a cliche. Yet, it seems to be a reasonable exercise to test one’s compass hypothetically once in a while, especially if self-discovery is something you hold dear.It is absolutely fascinating how human beings react when they’re confronted with equally…

The Body Myth by Rheea Mukherjee

Discomfort, by definition is something that we are trained to avoid, or walk away from. Yet somehow, it is the unifying factor of human life, forcing us to confront the banal truth of life – chaos is not the exception, but the rule. Order is not real, but simply an illusion we construct to distract…

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes. Actions have consequences. Perhaps no other adage can sum up the history of well….everything. Sometimes, the tiniest of steps result in the largest of leaps, and the deepest of jumps are in retrospect nothing but a swim in the shallow end. This remarkably simple principle is often…

The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro

I’ve always found it rather odd that the “success” of human beings has historically always been associated with positive extremes. The example of Musk sleeping on the floor of his company has become the global standard of the required extremities for entrepreneurial success. But it’s only on rare occasions that we collectively stop, look around,…